Import Christmas Beers

importxmas

Kerkom Bink Grand Cru
Belgian Strong Dark Ale, 13% ABV.

De Ranke Pere Noel
A fantastic Christmas beer, but one that defies the universal custom of a stronger, spicier beer for the holiday season. At 7% alcohol by volume, this one is relatively lighter in alcohol than the Guldenberg, and does not pack the hop punch of the XX. It combines some of the best elements of those other two beers – with a fine balance of malt and hops, complex character, a refreshing dryness, and a gorgeous cellar aroma – but is distinguished by its festive copper color.

Noel des Geants
The Brasserie des Géants, or Giant Brewery, is housed in a medieval castle in the town of Irchonwelz, in the French-speaking south of Belgium. The Géants Christmas beer came out in 2007, and it’s their best one yet. Rich and warming, and just a bit spicy (thanks to the delicate addition of a special aromatic herb from the region of the brewery), this festive ale has everything you want in a Belgian beer – but not the cheap sugary flavor that the more commercial breweries use to reel in a less sophisticated crowd.

Struise Tjeeses Reserva
Belgian Strong Pale Ale, 10% ABV. Two variants: one aged in Bourbon barrels, the other aged in Port barrels.

Nogne O Winter Ale
A dark ale brewed specially for the Christmas season, with a rich, complex taste of caramel. This is a strong, dark and rather sweet Christmas Beer – just the way we think a Christmas beer should be.

Mikkeller Winbic
Saison/sour ale blend.

Mikkeller Hoppy Lovin Christmas
Imperial IPA brewed with ginger and pine needles.

Mikkeller To From Via
Imperial porter.

Mikkeller From To Via
Imperial porter aged in Brandy barrels.

Samuel Smith Winter Welcome
This seasonal beer is a limited edition brewed for the short days and long nights of winter. The full body resulting from fermentation in ‘stone Yorkshire squares’ and the luxurious malt character, which will appeal to a broad range of drinkers, is balanced against whole-dried Fuggle and Golding hops with nuances and complexities that should be contemplated before an open fire.

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